The Right to Choose Legal Representation

NO WIN NO FEE SOLICITORS

BASED THROUGHOUT THE UK

0800 014 8727

Call Us Now - MON - FRI - 9AM to 5.30PM

NO WIN NO FEE SOLICITORS BASED THROUGHOUT THE UK

8000148727

07808 864607

Call Us Now - MON - FRI - 9AM to 5.30PM
If you have free minutes then by all means use the mobile number if it's easier for you to dial.

The Right to Choose Legal Representation

What is Legal Expenses Insurance?

Legal Expenses Insurance (LEI), either purchased separately or included as an element within home insurance policies, should meet the legal costs of policyholders when they encounter difficulties which require the advice or representation of a lawyer.

Restriction of the Right to Choose Legal Representation

Often policyholders find that when they decide to make a claim on their policy they are discouraged from choosing their own lawyer.  Insurers prefer policyholders to use a solicitor who has been appointed from a panel of solicitors and with whom they may have previously agreed reduced fees.  In effect, some financially motivated insurance companies are denying those whom they insure their right to choose legal representation.  The policyholder’s best interest might, however, be best served by a lawyer of his or her own choosing.  This is particularly the case where a policyholder is in need of specialist advice.  For example, a person with an employment dispute might be better represented by a specialist employment lawyer than by a generalist litigation lawyer.

The Law Guarantees the Individuals Right to Choose Legal Representation

Case law

 In the case of Maltez v Lewis 1999 it was held that

”It has always been a fundamental right of every citizen to be represented by a lawyer of his or her own choice”.

Legislation

Regulation 6 of  The Insurance Companies (Legal Insurance) Regulations 1990  prohibits insurance companies from restricting a policyholder’s right to choose legal representation.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority  Code of Conduct 2011

It’s possible that a solicitor acting for a client on the instructions of  a third parties (the insurer) in a way which could be considered a restriction on an individuals right to choose legal representation could amount to a breach of the Code of Conduct.

Mandatory Principle 3 ”A solicitor may not act where his or her independence might be compromised”.

Mandatory Principle 4 ”A solicitor must act in the best interests of each client.”

Further Advice

If you feel that you would like further advice on a legal matter or are being discouraged by your insurance provider from choosing your own lawyer you may wish to contact us on 0800 014 8727 for free initial advice.